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  #21  
Unread 7th August 2018, 09:25 AM
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Originally Posted by Beachworm View Post
I love a good argument and I don't want to quench the fire
I'd like to add that this exercise is not a "battle of the brands"!
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  #22  
Unread 9th August 2018, 11:25 PM
Beachworm Beachworm is offline
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Part 3.
Identifying Hazards

Most outdoor activity guidelines for 4 wheel driving classify hazards into 3 types:

1. Equipment
2. People
3. Environment

We identify hazards as a natural part of every day.
When driving off road, every time you move the steering wheel, apply the brakes or change gears you are reacting to a hazard that you have identified, even though you might not be conscious that it was a hazard.

Hazard identification comes naturally so you might ask why talk about it?

There are many things we don’t see as a hazard until they are pointed out to us otherwise there would never be any accidents or incidents.

It’s the not so obvious hazards that we need to become more aware of to improve the safety of our sport.

The suggestions that follow are by no means an exhaustive list and you will no doubt think of many more. This is just a start to get you thinking.

1. Equipment hazards:

a. Vehicle faults – do you give your vehicle a thorough check over before each off-road adventure? My military training required a check of the vehicle every morning before start-up. That’s a good practice to follow but most people don’t. Consider using a checklist such as a modified version of the following: https://www.thoughtco.com/going-off-road-checklist-3063 - or as a minimum, https://www.transport.wa.gov.au/lice...checklist.asp#

b. Recovery equipment – There isn’t much point inspecting your snatch strap for cuts and fraying after you become stuck and need to use it. The same goes for other items you may need on a difficult track. Inspect and replace damaged / unserviceable items a week before you leave so you have time to replace them if necessary.

c. Communications equipment –
i. are the batteries in your hand held radio charged?
ii. Is the antenna secure?
iii. Does the radio work properly?
iv. Will you have mobile coverage?
v. Will you need a sat phone – is it serviceable?
vi. Do you have an EPIRB?

d. Survival equipment – Do you have (in serviceable condition) all the equipment necessary to help you survive if necessary? A remote area first aid kit is a minimum for all trips.

2. People hazards:

a. Drivers coming in the opposite direction

b. Hikers, horse riders and pedestrians

c. Motor cycle riders

d. People known to be careless or risk takers

e. Inexperienced off-roaders

f. People with a known illness or health condition such as diabetes, heart problems, asthma, epilepsy, anaphalxsis, etc.

g. People with early signs of contagious illness such as the ‘flu (signs to look for are elevated temperature, general aches and pains or rashes)

3. Environmental hazards apart from rocks, logs, holes and other track hazards that affect your driving:

a. Heat – during periods of high temperatures and high exertion (such as digging a vehicle out of soft sand), ensure adequate fluid intake. Dehydration can lead to heat stroke and heat stroke can kill.

b. Cold – if your excursion will take you to places or altitudes where it is possible for temperatures to fall, ensure you take clothing appropriate for the conditions.

c. Sunburn – Follow the old “slip,slop, slap” and avoid sunburn at all cost.

d. Extreme weather events – be aware of the forecast for the whole of your trip, specifically for the area you will be in each day. Take the track conditions into account when planning your route. Make changes as necessary. Thunderstorms can be dangerous. Lightning can strike up to 15 Km in front of a storm. The safest place is in your vehicle.

e. Falling trees / limbs – Even in windless conditions, tree limbs can fall. They often fall silently and serious injury or death are usually the result if a person is in the wrong place at the wrong time. They don’t call dead limbs on trees widowmakers for nothing. When walking, camping or driving, don’t forget to look up and check for hazards.

f. Animals, insects, spiders – Australia is home to more dangerous reptiles, spiders and sea creatures than anywhere else on earth. Of the top 10 deadliest snakes on the planet, we have 9. The second deadliest spider on earth (funnel webs of several varieties) lives in the bush along the whole east coast. Dress appropriately for the location and be aware.

g. Flooding – River crossings are one of the fun things about off-road driving but always follow the rules. The following is an excellent example but there are many others. http://www.offroadaussie.com/2013/02...ter-crossings/

h. Bushfires – If fire danger is very high or extreme, consider postponing your trip. If that is not possible and you become involved in a fire, consider the tips in the following link. https://www.driverknowledgetests.com...gh-a-bushfire/

The next post will look at how to assess the risks associated with some of the hazards above so you can prioritise your resources to manage the risks in a way that gives you the maximum amount of safety possible.
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  #23  
Unread 10th August 2018, 02:50 PM
MiddleAgeSubie MiddleAgeSubie is offline
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OK, let's see


...

1. Equipment hazards:

a. Vehicle faults – do you give your vehicle a thorough check over before each off-road adventure?

Yes. Also, after each harder trail.

b. Recovery equipment . It is still unused...but yeah, check to see I know where every item is since I have them spread out under seats etc and something may get forgotten after cleaning.

c. Communications equipment –
i. are the batteries in your hand held radio charged? Yup, check.
ii. Is the antenna secure? What's that?
iii. Does the radio work properly?
iv. Will you have mobile coverage? Nope, satellite communicator instead.
v. Will you need a sat phone – is it serviceable?
vi. Do you have an EPIRB?

d. Survival equipment – Do you have (in serviceable condition) all the equipment necessary to help you survive if necessary? A remote area first aid kit is a minimum for all trips. Yeah, first aid kit plus lots of extra water and some emergency food in addition to lots of, ugh, actually edible food.

2. People hazards:

a. Drivers coming in the opposite direction. Couple near misses. One was just a street crossover on an easy dirt road. That one was really scary; I had seen the person and stopped already as far to the edge as I could. A bad experience with ATVs passing on a very narrow trail last month. Glad I have my rear quarter panels just scratched as opposed to damaged...

...
c. Motor cycle riders that can pass you on a very narrow mountain trail without letting you know they have materialized from nowhere in an instant.
...

3. Environmental hazards apart from rocks, logs, holes and other track hazards that affect your driving:

a. Heat – during periods of high temperatures and high exertion (such as digging a vehicle out of soft sand), ensure adequate fluid intake. Dehydration can lead to heat stroke and heat stroke can kill. I do not set wheels on desert trails in June, July, August, or September and avoid AZ desert trails in May and October as well. It is unbelievable and a tremendous workout for the vehicle as well.

b. Cold – if your excursion will take you to places or altitudes where it is possible for temperatures to fall, ensure you take clothing appropriate for the conditions. Are there any such places left?

c. Sunburn – Follow the old “slip,slop, slap” and avoid sunburn at all cost. Use sunscreen abundantly and also sun protective clothing. But most men must be "men" ....

d. Extreme weather events – be aware of the forecast for the whole of your trip, specifically for the area you will be in each day. Take the track conditions into account when planning your route. Make changes as necessary. Thunderstorms can be dangerous. Lightning can strike up to 15 Km in front of a storm. The safest place is in your vehicle. Experienced offroaders with extremely capable vehicles have been killed when caught by heavy rain on steep, narrow mountain trails.

e. Falling trees / limbs – Even in windless conditions, tree limbs can fall. They often fall silently and serious injury or death are usually the result if a person is in the wrong place at the wrong time. They don’t call dead limbs on trees widowmakers for nothing. When walking, camping or driving, don’t forget to look up and check for hazards. A trip to Montana last month drove this point home. Trees and limbs everywhere: above, under, on the sides, falling between the time you went in and the time you are going out two hours later, etc.

f. Animals, insects, spiders – Australia is home to more dangerous reptiles, spiders and sea creatures than anywhere else on earth. Of the top 10 deadliest snakes on the planet, we have 9. The second deadliest spider on earth (funnel webs of several varieties) lives in the bush along the whole east coast. Dress appropriately for the location and be aware. Yikes. This is why my spouse is no fan of visiting Australia. But I do not camp in the Sonoran desert either. It is possible but a long shot to run into rattlesnakes etc elsewhere around here.

g. Flooding – River crossings are one of the fun things about off-road driving but always follow the rules. The following is an excellent example but there are many others. http://www.offroadaussie.com/2013/02/4wd-tips-and-tricks-water-crossings/. Flash floods are what gets you in trouble here. Easy to avoid as it rarely rains: just do not go out after heavy rains. Guess this is much harder to predict in Australia.

h. Bushfires – If fire danger is very high or extreme, consider postponing your trip. If that is not possible and you become involved in a fire, consider the tips in the following link. https://www.driverknowledgetests.com/resources/how-to-drive-through-a-bushfire/ Driving over dry grass/bush is a great hazard.
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  #24  
Unread 10th August 2018, 10:17 PM
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Ben Up North Ben Up North is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MiddleAgeSubie View Post
[B]Driving over dry grass/bush is a great hazard.
As a side note, don't buy a Ford Ranger.(Although I think they may have done something about it). There have been numerous incidents in Australia of those setting the countryside on fire due to their catalytic converters (I think) being to low/hot.

They might have actually recalled the earlier models because of this (can't be bothered checking)

edit: News report
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