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  #1  
Unread 27th October 2008, 08:38 AM
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Post Offroad Driving Tips ( Auto and Manual )

Wise ORS Members,

Hoping we can build up some sort of database of Subaru Offroad Driving tips here. While there are many tips and techniques available online pertaining to the 4wd market I have found it difficult to source 'Good oil' relating to the AWD market. Automatic transmission is known to be better in sand but a shudder to think how much more we can get out of our cars rather than just chuck it in drive and amble along. Some key benefits of each transmission would nice, Including when to select higher revs in an auto ( Eg : Dropping to third, second or first ) and when to use the Hold and Power buttons. All information provided will help new and old members ( Stock, lifted, general mods etc etc ) and hopefully create AWD awareness off the beaten track ( Talk of standard recovery gear etc etc ).

Just need someone to get the ball rolling please!
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Unread 28th October 2008, 12:50 AM
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I think many newbies to offroad driving assume they just point and squirt as though they are driving on bitumen. The concepts of lifting wheels, open diffs and no traction are alien to them. The need to keep the vehicle as flat as possible without wheel lifting is most important.

In water, the most critical thing is to get out and determine how deep it is and what the surface underneath is. Grabbing a stick to use as a dipstick works well- as does walking throught it. Having a snorkel can be advantagous- as long as it is a sealed syetem. The last thing you want is it letting in water and/or falling off, but let's not go there! Maintaining momentum is critical, not too fast water goes everywhere but not too slow you get stuck. Joining up with experienced people will be a real benefit.

I recently had some pretty serious 4WD ing in NZ, where despite mud tyres it was a real battle- and this was just the access road to the farmhouse. The owner insisted on maximum attack, and we were literally bouncing off the scenery almost down an embankment. I found a slower approach, but still with some momentum, got me through- and unlike him, I did not get bogged.

I have not driven on sand so I will leave that to someone who has.

But in the main, it is about keeping all the wheels on the ground, which means finding the flattest ground, and maintaining some momentum. When we do a drive day or weekend away, come along and share the experience, because on all the trips I have been on, people have been very helpful in this regard. Ultimately, if you really do not want to attempt something that you feel is beyond you- don't do it.

That is not an exhaustive list by any means- others will no doubt add to it.
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Unread 28th October 2008, 01:58 AM
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Good suggestion, it will be very helpful to newbies like me.
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  #4  
Unread 28th October 2008, 10:30 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rally View Post
In water, the most critical thing is to get out and determine how deep it is and what the surface underneath is. Grabbing a stick to use as a dipstick works well- as does walking thought it. Having a snorkel can be advantageous- as long as it is a sealed system. The last thing you want is it letting in water and/or falling off, but let's not go there! Maintaining momentum is critical, not too fast water goes everywhere but not too slow you get stuck. Joining up with experienced people will be a real benefit.
Can not stress how important this is,$1500.00 lesson for me.

As for sand I've done a bit of it and steady on the gas and try not to stop in the real soft stuff and you'll be alright.
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Unread 31st October 2008, 01:09 AM
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I am no expert in 4WDing.....but the more you do offroad the more experience you will have on your belt and learning from your own mistakes....the only thing that is important to me is being reasonable what Fory can do and cannot do and be prepared all the time, so get out there and have fun
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Unread 31st October 2008, 03:05 AM
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For offroad tracks the most thing is wheel placement. Picking the right line, especially in an AWD, is the best way to get past a challenging track without damage. Take your time.

Last time we where on sand we attempted a large dune, but failed to make the top on the fist 2 go's. The gearbox (AT) would change gears near the top and we would lose all momentum. Put the gearbox in 1st and made it up no problems........
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Unread 3rd November 2008, 03:45 PM
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somebody told me a while back to keep your thumbs next to your index fingers while driving in really rough terrain. Reason being that if your wheel hits a rock or catches a rutt and tweaks your steering wheel really hard one way your thumbs won't get caught in the steering wheel and get jacked up..I don't know? I've never had my wheels turn suddenly really fast...anyone hear of this tip? sounds like it would make sense a little..
dan
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  #8  
Unread 3rd November 2008, 08:54 PM
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^ that's correct. It is recommended that you do not wrap your thumbs around the steering wheel because, if you do experience backlash, the spokes could break your thumbs.
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  #9  
Unread 3rd November 2008, 09:06 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rally View Post
I have not driven on sand so I will leave that to someone who has.

Briefly:

Go with others until you gain experience.
Lower tyres to 18 psi to begin - lower if the sand is very soft (but no lower than 10 psi)
No sharp turns - you could roll the softened tyre off the rim or even worse, roll the car (fairly common for the inexperienced).
No sharp braking - this will bog you; just let the car roll to a stop.
Better to stop when level or facing downhill; restarting uphill can be difficult.
No heavy acceleration from a standstill.
Have a sump guard or take the plastic guard off. Also take off those little wing things in front of the front wheels.
Make sure your vehicle is in excellent condition as sand can be the hardest strain your vehicle may face.
Keep an eye on your temp guage - stop if necessary to cool down.
Make sure you carry a lump of wood or a board that you can stand the jack on if it needs to be used.
Never transverse a dune or hill; always straight up or down.
If stuck uphill, drive the vehicle down in reverse; as little braking as possible.
AND - no thumbs around the steering wheel - you never know what is concealed under the sand!
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  #10  
Unread 4th November 2008, 09:03 PM
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yep, what kevin said, and bring a shovel!
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