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  #21  
Unread 18th January 2015, 06:15 PM
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Even so, I think the overhang behind the rear wheels may be illegal would it not?
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  #22  
Unread 18th January 2015, 07:29 PM
ateday ateday is offline
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That I don`t know but would certainly need to be investigated and is certainly a good and valid point.
The Innovan I saw was mounted on a, lengthened chassis, single cab Nissan Patrol ute owned by the designer at Toowoomba.
He reckoned it was all legal. He had lengthened the chassis to accommodate a towbar for his boat.
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  #23  
Unread 18th January 2015, 10:16 PM
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As I recall I could not get the Innovan to fit on the Triton double cab because the amount of overhang behind the rear wheels was too much to met the requirements (which I cannot recall at present).
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  #24  
Unread 19th January 2015, 12:52 AM
ateday ateday is offline
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Yes so a lengthening of chassis to move rear axle back by about 500 mm is needed.
This gives an effective 800 mm extra tray length.
However investigation will be trquired
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  #25  
Unread 19th January 2015, 01:41 AM
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ateday have you asked Innovan for pictures on any dual cab setups? After recently going through a dual cab work setup careful thought and detail about where things were positioned to make sure even disbursement of load was achieved. Depending what your vehicle is also depends on whether a heavier suspension is necessary for everything to be cricket and your load a safe one to carry. If your unit itself weighs 500kg, that's a fair amount before you go adding necessities such as water and spare fuel etc let alone recovery gear/clothes & food. Then you've got to factor in how much the humans weigh that you put in the vehicle. The many hours of research you will do most certainly will provide you with a top vehicle at the end of it.

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  #26  
Unread 19th January 2015, 02:10 AM
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Thanks Scooby2 for your input.
Yes there are still many things to investigate. To my knowledge no twin cabs have yet been used with the slide on Innovan.
The chassis will certainly need to be lengthened by about 500 mm and the rear axle moved back by this amount. This has the advantage that there will be more useful, and useable, load carrying space alongside the chassis rails for fuel and water tanks. All below the C of G so that aids stability.
Suspension will need to be heavy duty, possibly air bag assisted so that unladen ride will not be too rugged.
Not a dead cert yet by any means, many things yet to be investigated.
Could be too expensive at the end of it all but probably still less than an all singing, all dancing, camper van
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  #27  
Unread 19th January 2015, 02:43 AM
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Don't use air bags - they are a well known cause of bending the chassis on utes. It's because they take the load at a single point rather than spread across the rear suspension; they are also very unreliable and prone to leakage.

I wonder if an Iveco Daily 4x4 could take an Innovan unmodified - quite possible I think but @ $90K in base form somewhat expensive but they are an awesome vehicle: http://www.traveltrucks.com.au/4x4-iveco-daily
http://www.traveltrucks.com.au/4x4-ute
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  #28  
Unread 19th January 2015, 03:26 AM
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The Iveco is indeed good and there is a mob in Brizbanal who build and modify them into buses for mining companies and 4WD camper vans. Expensive but with diff locks, dual range and something like 6 or 8 speed gearboxes coupled with a heavy duty suspension are excellent.
Air bags I would only use with(in) coil springs.
The search continues.
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  #29  
Unread 19th January 2015, 05:18 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kevin View Post
Don't use air bags - they are a well known cause of bending the chassis on utes. It's because they take the load at a single point rather than spread across the rear suspension.
There is a known issue with long moment arm towing (distance from axle/suspension load point to tow coupling). Probably the worst type of vehicle for this is the BT-50/Ranger when an uprated rear suspension is fitted.

Because of the long moment arm, a ball weight near the limit causes butt-sag, and this is exacerbated by any load in the tub. Heavy-duty springs and uprated shocks merely address the sag, BUT all of a sudden the effect of the bending moment on the vehicle structure is worsened by the stiffness. The usual signs are structural deformation, often first noticed by creasing of the bodywork around the wheel arch area. And yet people keep buying these as tow tugs for their 3.5T vans! As Richie would say, "Remarkable!"
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  #30  
Unread 19th January 2015, 05:35 AM
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Gidday Ate

I have looked at an awful lot of these modern dual or large cab units since becoming aware of the loading problems associated with them. BTW, I mean eye-balled, not inspected closely ...

IMHO, none of these modern vehicles are suitable for carrying even the loads that we would routinely put in the station ute in my youth. e.g. full 44 gallon drums, engines and the like. With the old ute/s, the load was up against the back of the cab, and that put it fully between the axles.

With these ersatz utility vehicles, there is insufficient room to put any heavy load in this position. The rear axle is just far too close to the front of the well. From my observations, all of these vehicles are relying on the strength of their chassis to counteract the huge cantilever effect, and as Kevin and Zippo have already said, it just isn't strong enough.

When I look at photos of my 1968 Landcruiser deep well ute, the axle was around half way from the front of the well to the rear, and it had a bloody strong chassis, to boot! Almost nothing appears to be designed this way these days. They have all become 'designer vehicles', not work vehicles ... .

Just my two bob's worth, FWIW.
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