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  #11  
Old 29th December 2012, 06:41 PM
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Originally Posted by Tweaksta View Post
Been planning on getting my wildlife carer license for a while now. I will get onto it soon.
Get as much experience as you can first by being a shelter helper. The carer will teach you what you need to know (there's a lot...each species has specific requirements & each animal unique needs) then you can get your carer's license knowing your well prepared with good backup.

Goodonya for wnating to do it. Its not easy, sometimes heartbreaking, but also soooo rewarding!

My most valuable experince is hand feeding 2 baby koalas 3x per day for several months. They are almost human, just fluffy lol. It was a very rare thing, something I will always treasure

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Originally Posted by taza View Post
I like to think I have done the right thing in not letting them suffer before death.
Its a very difficult call...you're meant to let a carer make that call but what do you do out in the bush? Only thing I can suggest is put the local carer's no in your phone & if you have reception, follow their advice. (or call Michelle from Animalia Wildlife Shelter (0435 822 699)...she knows carers from all over the country & what she doesnt know bout wildlife rescue isnt worth knowing. You can ALWAYS call her; she is VERY devoted)

You did the right thing not letting them suffer when there's no-one around to help. Well done for caring, so many don't! Just make sure you check the pouch after...

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Originally Posted by Fly View Post
Funny how to me, these animals are exotic, extraordinary creatures we see at the zoo... while they are "common roadkills" for you. Eh!
We have an adult male koala struggling for survival atm, the result of a car hit. He's in prime condition & is a fighter, I believe he'll pull through...
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  #12  
Old 29th December 2012, 06:53 PM
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More good info NachaLuva

I've added that number to my mobile. Hopefully I'll never need to use it, but it's now there just in case

Thats great news about the Koala too, sounds like he's a fighter

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  #13  
Old 30th December 2012, 01:29 PM
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Originally Posted by Fly View Post
Funny how to me, these animals are exotic, extraordinary creatures we see at the zoo... while they are "common roadkills" for you. Eh!

Some of these are cute I grew up in the city, so I did not have many animals around... but we did recover and help a few birds that had struck windows, including a few birds of prey over the years... I remember an owl and a sparrow. We were very surprised to see them in the middle of the city.
You have moose, deer, buffalo, squirrels, rattle snakes and others which we see in the same way I guess.

Kudo's on the rescue work, I've helped a few birds but hit and killed many more driving on country roads unfortunately, roo's cost me a fortune when I was younger, almost completely wrote off 2 cars because of them.

I wouldn't suggest anyone go near an adult roo that is injured and try to pick it up, it'll rip you to shreds, personally I'd rather put it out of it's misery.
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  #14  
Old 30th December 2012, 02:38 PM
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I'll 2nd that about the Roo d_generate. Especially an injured adult male.
They are extremely strong & powerful & can inflict some nasty (possibly deadly) injuries.
I'm not saying don't help them, if you can. Just remember that they are not only injured, but also scared & may defend themselves.

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  #15  
Old 30th December 2012, 03:59 PM
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Great post. I was in the Victorian mallee when I approached a flock of galahs. Most flew off but a few remained, which was unusual. My mate in the car following radioed me and asked if I had hit one. I replied in the negative and he said that there was an injured bird. So we stopped and returned to the scene. It was not a pleasant experience. One galah had a wing totally ripped off, and the noise it made as we attempted to to catch it was truly horrible. Eventually we were close enough to throw a towel over it and place it in a box. Another bird was also injured, and we did the same. All 5 of us knew we had to kill the bird with the severed wing, but none of us had the guts to do it.

A car approached and fortunately the driver was a cocky, and asked us what had happened. We informed him none of had the heart to kill the bird, and when he said he was a cocky we were thankful, and he volunteered to do what needed to be done. We tried to find the number for WIRES, but for whatever reason that did not work out so we took the remaining bird to the vet in the next town. Unfortunately, it's broken wing meant that bird also had to be put down.

I also was in a car that hit a wedge tail eagle in the NT. As with the galah, I lament the fact that I just don't have the heart to kill injured animals. I think this is the problem for many people with regards injured wildlife in the outback. It's just too far to get help, there is no mobile phone overage out there unless you have a sat phone and the thought of killing the poor creature is too much for many people not brought up on the land. I don't know what the answer is. Yes, I could get get some concrete and HTFU I suppose. I'd be interested to hear what others have done in similar circumstances and if my mates and I are the world's greatest woos's.
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  #16  
Old 30th December 2012, 05:03 PM
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Originally Posted by Rally View Post
I'd be interested to hear what others have done in similar circumstances and if my mates and I are the world's greatest woos's.
I can understand dealing with roadkill is a shocking experience for many city dwellers, but for those in the bush, it's just a normal part of daily life.

As you say, it depends on how you were raised. Personally, I was brought up in the bush, and have no problem with killing an injured animal. We used to slaughter sheep in the backyard, and by the time I was 5 or 6 I'd probably dispatched a few hundred rabbits. Roadkill is a little different though, because you generally have to fight a scared, injured animal, and sometimes the struggle can be rather messy. I hate seeing half-dead snakes pinned in the middle of the road, wriggling around but getting nowhere (kind of like an out-of-control fire hose). I usually stop and move it well off the road.

A small piece of advice - if you are going to move dead wildlife off the road, make sure it's WELL off the road, not just on the edge. Dead animals attract other animals (foxes, eagles etc) and if it's on the side of the road, these usually end up being hit too. The number of dead eagles I saw across the Nullarbor was really sad - they feed on the roadkill, and are too big to get out of the way quickly, so end up getting hit themselves.
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  #17  
Old 30th December 2012, 06:18 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rally View Post
I was in the Victorian mallee when I approached a flock of galahs. Most flew off but a few remained, which was unusual. My mate in the car following radioed me and asked if I had hit one. I replied in the negative and he said that there was an injured bird. So we stopped and returned to the scene. It was not a pleasant experience.....

.....All 5 of us knew we had to kill the bird with the severed wing, but none of us had the guts to do it.
I have personally only been involved with a situation like this 2 or maybe 3 times. Each time it was Galahs not moving away in time.
On 2 of those occasions, I had to put them out of their misery.
Was it easy, no, but I know I made the right decision. Sometimes you have to be cruel to be kind, if you know what I mean.

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Originally Posted by Rally View Post
I'd be interested to hear what others have done in similar circumstances and if my mates and I are the world's greatest woos's.
No mate, not woos's, just human.

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  #18  
Old 30th December 2012, 07:19 PM
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The eagle we collected was diving for road kill.
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  #19  
Old 30th December 2012, 09:07 PM
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On my last trip my GF and I set off with a mission. The mission was to have ZERO roadkill for the entire trip. We ended up travelling 8000km and the only roadkill we were responsible for were the winged insects embedded in the windscreen.

We consciously tried to avoid travelling after dark (and if we did we drove slowly), and in the heavily bird-dominant areas of SA and VIC we drove at 80km/h in 100km/h zones. This seemed to be enough to allow the wrens and honeyeaters to duck for cover on our approach.

Of course, we couldn't stop the heartless redneck bogans from doing 140 in 100km/h zones just ploughing through so we still had to see the carcasses of some beloved species with beaks/bills/wings ripped off or bodies split right open which was somewhat traumatic for us.

We always try to practice ultra low-impact touring by only leaving tyre tracks. No carcasses, no evidence of fires, no human waste, no litter and only taking photographs away with us.
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  #20  
Old 9th January 2013, 01:00 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by d_generate View Post
I wouldn't suggest anyone go near an adult roo that is injured and try to pick it up, it'll rip you to shreds, personally I'd rather put it out of it's misery.
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Originally Posted by mr turbo View Post
They are extremely strong & powerful & can inflict some nasty (possibly deadly) injuries.
I've only been involved in a few wallaby/kangaroo rescues, even injured they are still fast & powerful. I leave all the tricky stuff to the boss-lady lol. Michelle's skills have to be seen to be believed!

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Originally Posted by sjm View Post
f you are going to move dead wildlife off the road, make sure it's WELL off the road, not just on the edge. Dead animals attract other animals (foxes, eagles etc) and if it's on the side of the road, these usually end up being hit too.
Spot on. In tassie where the quolls still have a foothold, they are another common secondary road kill

Quote:
The number of dead eagles I saw across the Nullarbor was really sad - they feed on the roadkill, and are too big to get out of the way quickly, so end up getting hit themselves.
Apart from killing such a magnificent animal, you would think the risk of having the worlds 3rd largest (I think lol) eagle come smashing through the windscreen would make people drive slower around wildlife.

Its a shameful note in our countries history that there once used to be a bounty on wedge-tailed eagles...they were slaughtered in their thousands!

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Originally Posted by Rally View Post
All 5 of us knew we had to kill the bird with the severed wing, but none of us had the guts to do it.
You're not the only one! I've thought about what I would do many times, where the animal needs euthanasia beyond doubt & the nearest vet is just too far. I hope I dont ever have to find out....

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tweaksta View Post
On my last trip my GF and I set off with a mission. The mission was to have ZERO roadkill for the entire trip. We ended up travelling 8000km and the only roadkill we were responsible for were the winged insects embedded in the windscreen.
Awesome effort!

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We always try to practice ultra low-impact touring by only leaving tyre tracks. No carcasses, no evidence of fires, no human waste, no litter and only taking photographs away with us.
Leave only memories & take only photos
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